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Faculty of Science Mathematics & Statistics
Faculty of Science

Mathematics & Statistics

Graduate Student Handbook

Graduate Student Handbook – MSc and PhD in Mathematics, MSc Statistics
Approved:May 2018

Note that the Graduate Calendar is the primary authority on graduate policy and in the event that the advice in this handbook differs from the Graduate Calendar the Graduate Calendar prevails.

This Handbook is aimed primarily at graduate students in the Mathematics MSc, the Statistics MSc, the Mathematics PhD program, staff in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and staff in the Faculty of Science. Note that there are separate handbooks for the CSE and MFM programs. If you are a student in one of these programs you should consult the relevant handbook.

Introduction
1.Contacts
2.When You Arrive
3.Program Committee
4.Annual Events
5.Degree Specific Information
6.Skills Training and Other Resources
7.Teaching Assistant Duties

Introduction

Welcome to the Department of Mathematics and Statistics! We are one of the top research departments in Canada and prominent internationally. Particular strengths in mathematics research include geometry and topology, mathematical biology, mathematical finance, mathematical logic and foundations, pure and applied partial differential equations, scientific computation and statistics.   Our department also has excellent connections to other departments in Science (particularly Physics and Astronomy, Chemistry and Biology) as well as to the faculties of Engineering and business. (Mathematical trivia: John Charles Fields, who founded the Fields Medal, was born, raised and is buried in Hamilton https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Charles_Fields!)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics is housed in Hamilton Hall, which is one of the original six buildings constructed in 1929 when McMaster University moved from Toronto to Hamilton. It was originally the Faculty of Science building (including labs for Manhattan Project work during World War II). After several decades as the Student Union Building, in 2003 Hamilton Hall was renovated specially for the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics. The architects were KPMB, who won many awards for the renovation, including the Governor General’s Gold Medal for Architecture, the Institute Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects, and the Architectural Record (Interiors) Award. See http://www.kpmb.com/project/james-stewart-centre-for-mathematics/ for more information.

The primary goal of our program is to provide high quality training in mathematical research, enriching advanced courses and to build awareness and links with the broader scientific community. In particular, our extensive range of the weekly research group seminars, the Friday colloquium and the annual Britton and Nelson lectures allow you to hear and meet top international experts (including Fields medallists!). Our Department is also closely involved with the Fields Institute in Toronto and you will have the opportunity to take the graduate courses they offer as part of the regular thematic programs http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/activities/thematic. The seminars, colloquium, special lectures and Fields lectures are advertised each week by email and on the website. Note that all graduate students are expected to attend the weekly Colloquium.

The Associate Chair (Graduate) and the entire Faculty are here to help ensure that you get the most out of your studies, and to prepare you for your future career. Don’t hesitate to ask any one of us for advice or support.

This Handbook focuses on information specific to the graduate programs in Mathematics and Statistics. For important general information for graduate students in the Faculty of Science, including a link to the current Graduate Calendar, please see:

https://www.science.mcmaster.ca/graduate-studies/grad-helpful-links.html

1. Contacts

Associate Chair (Graduate)
Bartosz Protas
bprotas@mcmaster.ca, x24116, HH 326
The Graduate Chair is the first point of contact for any issues you might have.

Associate Chair (Statistics)
Shui Feng
shuifeng@mcmaster.ca, x24723, HH 211
First point of contact for graduate students studying statistics.

Administrative Assistant for the Graduate Program
Diana Holmes
holmesd@mcmaster.ca, x24582, HH 218
Diana handles general administrative issues, can provide forms and help with organizing MSc defences.

Administrator
Julie Fogarty
fogarty@mcmaster.ca, x24580, HH 218
Julie handles financial issues and can answer questions about your funding.

Teaching Assistant Coordinator
Aaron Childs
childsa@mcmaster.ca, x23426, HH 213
Aaron coordinates Teaching Assistant (TA) assignments.

Graduate Committee for 2018-2019

Bartek Protas(Chair), Stan Alama, Hans Boden, Ben Bolker, Angelo Canty, Shui Feng, Tom Hurd, Patrick Speissegger.

This committee advises on changes to the Departmental graduate program and deals with general issues relating to the operations of the program.

School of Graduate Studies
Gilmour Hall 212
askgrad@mcmaster.ca, x23679
General information about graduate studies and policies at McMaster.

2. When You Arrive

See Sheree Cox at the front desk in the Departmental Office (HH 218) for the following:

  • A key for your office (you need to provide a $10 refundable deposit)
  • Health and safety package
  • Desk assignment
  • Computer account and email
  • Mail box assignment
  • Other orientation information

International (visa) students must go to the School of Graduate Studies with your study permit. 

International students should refer to the information at https://gs.mcmaster.ca/graduate-student-life/international-students and at https://iss.mcmaster.ca/ for information about study permits, Social Insurance Number, health coverage and general information about living in Hamilton.

If you have not already submitted your official transcripts you must bring them to Diana Holmes in a sealed envelope so she can forward them to the School of Graduate Studies.

MSc (thesis) and PhD students: make an appointment to meet with your supervisor.

MSc (project) students: make an appointment to meet with the Associate Chair (Graduate).

Orientation activities offered by the School of Graduate Studies are advertised here:
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/news-events/event-series

Note that all graduate students must pass the School of Graduate Studies online courses SGS 101 (Academic Research Integrity and Ethics) and SGS 201 (Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act). These can be completed very easily and quickly, but you cannot graduate until you have passed them, so please attempt them as soon as possible.Information on enrolling in SGS 101 and 201 and other courses is available here:https://gs.mcmaster.ca/academic-services/how-enroll

You are expected to apply for all scholarships for which you are eligible (based on your academic record and immigration status). The main awards are the NSERC CGS-Masters and CGS-Doctoral and the OGS awards. Please look out for emails giving deadlines and the application procedures. The School of Graduate Studies also hosts an NSERC information session.

All graduate students must activate their @mcmaster.ca email address and check their email on a regular basis - this is the email address that will be used for all communication with students.

3. Program Committee

The Associate Chair (Graduate) works with the Graduate Committee to manage and develop the program.  Decisions include curriculum changes (courses to add or remove), changes in course content and degree requirements.
If you have suggestions for improving the program, you can speak to the Associate Chair (Graduate) or any member of the Committee.  Please send your course suggestions by the end of the Fall term.


4. Annual Events

Graduate Day (first week of September). This is a daylong series of events for new and returning graduate students. There are orientation sessions as well as information on your teaching assistantship duties in the Department. The day is capped off with a Welcome reception with faculty. This is an opportunity to meet your fellow students and the faculty. Each faculty member gives a brief overview of his or her research. There is always free pizza and pop!

Britton Lectures. This is series of four lectures by an internationally renowned mathematician that has been held annually since 1978. There is also a reception at the University Club. The list of exceptional past Britton lecturers and the themes of their talks are available here:
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/events/seminars-colloquia/britton-lectures.html
These lectures were made possible by a generous endowment by former faculty member Dr Ron Britton.

Evelyn Nelson Lectures – an annual lecture held since 1991 on foundations of mathematics to honour the memory of former faculty member Evelyn Nelson. The list of past lectures is given here:
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/events/seminars-colloquia/evelyn-nelson-lectures.html

Preliminary Exams: held twice each academic year, in January and May (see section 5(d) below for information about these exams).

Symposium Day (June): MSc (project) students give oral presentations on their projects in mid June.

5. Degree Specific Information

Applicants for admission to the Mathematics or Statistics MSc should have BA or BSc honours degree with at least a B+ standing (77%, equivalent to a McMaster 8.5 GPA out of 12 average in the final year), or equivalent and a good background in mathematics and statistics.  We expect students to have taken a sufficient number (approximately ten) third and fourth year mathematics or statistics courses. Two strong reference letters must also be provided in support of applications.
Successful applicants will normally have contacted a faculty member who has indicated their interest in supervising the applicant.

Students with a degree in engineering, science, health sciences, or social sciences will be considered, provided they have a B+ average with sufficient mathematics and statistics background. Students coming from other areas may be required to take additional undergraduate courses to make up any deficiencies. . Please contact the Associate Chair (Graduate) if you are unsure whether your background is sufficient.

Applicants for admission to the PhD should normally have an MSc from a Canadian university and two strong letters of reference. Applicants without a Canadian MSc should apply to the MSc; you may apply to transfer to the PhD after one year (see section d below).

Full information about the application procedure is available here:

https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/application-procedure.html

  •  Math MSc (project)

    The candidate must complete a minimum of seven one-term graduate courses, one of which is required to be Mathematics 790 (Major Research Project). This selection must include no fewer than four 700-level courses in Mathematics. Of the remaining courses, up to two relevant one-term graduate courses from outside mathematics may also be taken for credit. At most two one-term 600-level courses (cross-listed fourth year undergraduate courses) may be counted towards the course requirements.
    Students considering doctoral work should complete two of the two-term course sequences from Algebra 701/702, Analysis 721/722, and Applied Math 741/742.
    You must have your course selection approved at the start of each term by your supervisor and/or the Associate Chair (Graduate).
    The full list of graduate courses is given in the Graduate Calendar. A list of the graduate courses actually offered each year is published here:
    https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/graduate-courses.html
    Note that some courses are offered in alternate years, for example, the course sequences math 731/732, (Algebraic Topology I and II), and math 761/762 (Geometric Topology/Differential Geometry), as are math 745 (Topics in Numerical Analysis) and math 749 (Mathematical and Computational Fluid Dynamics).

    You will not normally have a supervisor when you arrive. Until you find a supervisor for your Math 790 project the Associate Chair (Graduate) is your supervisor. You need to find a project supervisor by the end of November and the Associate Chair (Graduate) can help you. Once you have found a supervisor you must let the Associate Chair (Graduate) know the name of your supervisor and the title of your project. A course outline will be distributed for Math 790 at the beginning of the year with complete information about the project. Students make a written report on their project and give an oral presentation at the Symposium Day in June. Examples of previous projects and available projects can be viewed here.

    You should meet regularly with your project supervisor (once a week is typical) and respond promptly to emails from your supervisor. Be sure to discuss your supervisor’s expectations regarding meetings and response times as early as possible.
    Advice on ensuring a good relationship with your supervisor is available here:
    https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/supervisory_relationshipjuly_222016.pdf

    The duration of the MSc (project) is normally 10-12 months.
  • Math MSc (thesis)

    The candidate must complete a minimum of six one-term graduate courses. This selection must include no fewer than four 700-level courses in Mathematics. Of the remaining courses, up to two relevant one-term graduate courses from outside mathematics may also be taken for credit. At most two one-term 600-level courses (cross-listed fourth year undergraduate courses) may be counted towards the course requirements.
    You must have your course selection approved at the start of each term by your supervisor.
    The full list of graduate courses is given in the Graduate Calendar. A list of the graduate courses actually offered each year is published here:
    https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/graduate-courses.html
    Note that some courses are offered in alternate years, for example, the course sequences math 731/732, (Algebraic Topology I and II), and math 761/762 (Geometric Topology/Differential Geometry), as are math 745 (Topics in Numerical Analysis) and math 749 (Mathematical and Computational Fluid Dynamics).
    The candidate must also submit a thesis written under the supervision of a faculty member and based on original research. The thesis is defended at an oral examination.
    Information about how to prepare your written thesis:
    https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/guide_for_the_preparation_of_masters_and_doctoral_theses-_december_2016.pdf
    You should meet regularly with your supervisor (once a week is typical) and respond promptly to emails from your supervisor. Be sure to discuss your supervisor’s expectations regarding meetings and response times as early as possible.
    Advice on ensuring a good relationship with your supervisor is available here:
    https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/supervisory_relationshipjuly_222016.pdf

    The duration the MSc (thesis) is normally 20 months. 
  • Statistics MSc

    The Coursework Option requires completion of eight one-term graduate courses (four compulsory and four elective courses). The seminar course is the research component for this option. The degree requirements are normally completed in two or three academic terms.
    The Thesis Option requires completion of six one-term graduate courses (four compulsory and two elective courses) and a thesis. Equivalent in work to two one-semester courses, the thesis is written under the supervision of a faculty member in the program on a topic of mutual interest to the student and supervisor. The thesis is defended in an oral exam. The degree requirements are normally completed in four academic terms.
    Courses are classified as required, elective, and special topics courses. Two of the required courses cover the basic theoretical concepts that are considered essential for all students. Another required course develops a broad knowledge of statistics through attendance at research seminars. The elective courses are traditional statistics courses covering a sufficient variety of topics to offer students a choice based upon their individual interests. Approved courses from other graduate programs may be taken as elective courses for graduate credit. The following are the required courses:
  • Stats 743 / Foundations of Statistics (two one-term courses Stats 743 A & B)
  • Stats 752 / Linear Models and Experimental Designs (one one-term course)
  • Stats 770 / Statistics Seminar
    A variety of elective courses are available to cater to individual interests. One area of specialization is health and medical statistics, with theses supervised by biostatisticians from the Faculty of Health Sciences, who are faculty members in the program and who, usually, are associate members in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Through courses and thesis work students learn about modern methodologies and conduct research on current health problems. Students interested in a broader area of applied or theoretical statistics may obtain training in one or more of the following areas: applied statistics, classification, clustering, comparative inference, computational statistics, economics, environmetrics, evolutionary computation, nonlinear models, nonparametric methods, order statistics, reliability, stochastic models in biology, statistical methods in genetics, the bootstrap and other resampling methods, time series analysis, and quality control. Students interested in business or industrial applications may arrange to do their thesis work off-campus. 
  • MSc Students Transferring to the PhD

    There are three ways to transfer from the MSc to the PhD. Each option requires that you have identified a supervisor willing to supervise your PhD research.
    • Transfer directly to the PhD program without completing an MSc by first registering for the thesis option and then submitting an application for transfer after 12 to 20 months.
    • Transfer to the PhD and complete the MSc after the transfer 
    • Complete the MSc and then transfer.

All options require completion of six one-term graduate courses, taking and passing the preliminary exam (see section 5(d) below), submission of a research proposal, and a statement from the proposed supervisor.
Successful applicants may apply all accumulated credits to the PhD degree, but are still required to complete two one-term courses beyond the MSc once registered in the PhD program.
MSc students wishing to transfer must submit the following form with their request:
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/change_of_status_form_september_2017.pdf

All MSc degrees awarded since 1961:
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/56-/msc-mathematics/607-degrees-awarded-msc-math.html
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/graduate-degrees-awarded/57-/msc-statistics/608-degrees-awarded-msc-stats.html

  •  PhD Mathematics

     The focus of the PhD program is original research done under the supervision of a faculty member (their “supervisor”). Students are normally admitted with a supervisor, although in exceptional cases it is possible to change supervisors.
    Duties of PhD students
    All PhD students must:
  • Develop a research program.
  • Complete the course requirement, which is a minimum of two one-term graduate courses in Mathematics at the 700 level beyond the MSc requirement.
  • Complete the comprehensive examinations requirement, which means passing the written preliminary exam (if not already completed as an MSc student) and the oral examination.
  • Be jointly responsible with their supervisor for the organization of the (at least) annual meetings of the supervisory committee and the timely submission of the written report to the department.
  • Write an acceptable thesis based on original research and present an oral defence of the thesis.

Supervision and the Supervisory Committee
Every PhD student must have a supervisory committee. This committee consists of the supervisor and two or three additional faculty members. The committee meets with the student at least annually to chart progress toward the degree. The supervisory committee members are chosen for their expertise relevant to your research and they are a very valuable resource. The supervisory committee members also take part in the oral comprehensive exam (see below) and the thesis defence (see below).
You should meet regularly with your supervisor (once a week is typical) and respond promptly to emails from your supervisor. Be sure to discuss your supervisor’s expectations regarding meetings and response times as early as possible.
The supervisory committee form:
https://science.mcmaster.ca/radgrad/images/GradResources/GradResources_supervisoryPhD.doc
Advice on ensuring a good relationship with your supervisor and guidelines on:
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/supervisory_relationshipjuly_222016.pdf
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/graduate_work_supervision_guidelines_1.pdf

Course Requirements
The course requirement for PhD students is a minimum of two one-term graduate courses beyond the Master's degree. This requirement is normally completed in the first year of study. Courses are chosen in consultation with the mathematics graduate advisor and/or the supervisory committee.
The full list of graduate courses is given in the Graduate Calendar. A list of the graduate courses offered each year:
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/graduate-courses.html
Note that some courses are offered in alternate years, for example, the course sequences math 731/732, (Algebraic Topology I and II), and math 761/762 (Geometric Topology/Differential Geometry) are offered in alternate years, as are math 745 (Topics in Numerical Analysis) and math 749 (Mathematical and Computational Fluid Dynamics).
Comprehensive Exams
The Comprehensive Exam consists of two parts: the Preliminary Exam (normally taken at the MSc level by students who have transferred) and the Oral Exam.
The Preliminary Exam is offered each academic year in January and May and should be completed within eight months of entering the graduate program (if not already completed as a MSc student). Students who do not successfully complete the comprehensive exam requirements within 16 months of entering the program may be asked to withdraw due to lack of progress.
Preliminary Comprehensive Exam. All PhD students must pass one preliminary exam, which is a written exam covering basic material that is normally taught at the undergraduate level. Preliminary exams are offered in the following three areas (click on the relevant link for more information about the topics of each exam):

  1. Pure Mathematics
  2. Applied Mathematics
  3. Probability and Statistics

Students who do not pass the preliminary exam on their first attempt are permitted a second attempt at the same exam. 
Detailed information about the Preliminary exam, and sample exams from previous years:
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/40-/107-ph-d-comprehensive-examinations.html

Oral Comprehensive Exam. All PhD students must pass an oral examination in the general area of their proposed research. The subject matter for the oral exam is based on a body of knowledge agreed upon by the student and his or her supervisor. Material can chosen from advanced textbooks and published papers, or the exam can take the form of a research proposal for the PhD research project. The examining committee consists of three faculty members, including the supervisor, who is the chair of the examining committee. All members of the examining committee must be informed of the subject matter well in advance of the exam, which should not exceed two hours. Student who do not pass the oral exam on their first attempt are permitted a second attempt at the same exam.
Detailed information about the Oral Exam:
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/40-/107-ph-d-comprehensive-examinations.html

The Written Thesis and the PhD Oral Defence
It is essential that a student submitting a PhD thesis follow the procedures described in the Graduate Calendar. In particular, note that authorization of the Supervisory Committee must be obtained before preparing the final version of the thesis, and that the format of the typed thesis should be exactly as specified in the "Guide for the Preparation of Theses" (linked below).  The Supervisory Committee must also approve the final version of the thesis for submission.
Once approved by the Supervisory committee, the thesis is submitted to the School of Graduate Studies, which will then arrange the Oral Thesis Defence and appoint an external examiner, based on recommendations submitted by the Supervisory Committee. It is important that students submit their theses by the appropriate deadline given in the Graduate Calendar in order to be able to graduate at a particular convocation.

General information from the School of Graduate Studies about the PhD thesis, defence and submission process:
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/doctoral-degree

Information about preparing the written thesis:
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/guide_for_the_preparation_of_masters_and_doctoral_theses-_december_2016.pdf

Information about the PhD oral defence process:
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/sites/default/files/resources/the_student_guide_to_the_phd_defence_process_0.pdf

A list of all PhD degrees awarded since 1960:
https://www.math.mcmaster.ca/index.php/graduate-studies/58-/phd-mathematics/606-degrees-awarded-phd.html

6. Skills Training and Other Resources

The School of Graduate Studies and the MacPherson Institute offer a wide range of skills training modules and workshops. Topics including Academic writing, academic job search, teaching and many others.Please try to take advantage of this opportunity to build up your skill set and set yourself up to succeed in your future careers.
https://gs.mcmaster.ca/graduate-student-life/skills-training
https://mi.mcmaster.ca/teaching-learning-certificates-of-completion/
The MacPherson Institute also offers opportunities for community engagement:
http://mcyu.ca/mcyu-in-the-city-facilitators/

7. Teaching Assistant (TA) duties

Almost all graduate students work as teaching assistants (TAs).  This is a paid position that is a part of your financial offer on admission.  Typically, graduate students work 266 hours per year, although this amount varies.  (Note that you cannot work more than 505 hours in total, including your 266 hours.)

Your TA work is governed by the collective agreement  negotiated between the University and the TA union CUPE 3906 https://cupe3906.org/.  This agreement is renegotiated regularly, and in the case that the information in this document disagrees with the collective agreement, it is the collective agreement that takes precedence.

You will be able to find out more about your TA duties during special sessions at Graduate Student Day, held annually in early September.

The Teaching Assistant Coordinator (see Contacts) is primarily responsible for assigning TA duties, which may include invigilating test and exams, marking assignments and tests, staffing the Math Help Centre, running tutorials or teaching some courses (primarily summer courses).

Assignment of TA duties     

The TA Coordinator assigns TA duties to each TA at the beginning of each term based on the expressed preferences of the TA, the abilities and experience of the TA and the teaching needs of the Department.  You may be assigned to several courses in a single term to fulfil your total TA hours.  The precise nature of the work is determined by your supervisor (e.g. the Math Help Centre coordinator or the professor teaching the course).

TAs typically start with marking and/or working in the Math Help Centre.  If a TA does well in the Math Help Centre they are likely to be assigned to run a tutorial, and if they do well running tutorials they could be asked to teach a course (although there are currently relatively few opportunities for TAs to teach a course). 

If you are interested in running a tutorial or teaching a course you should let the TA Coordinator know in advance.

Evaluation and training

Regular feedback is an important part of becoming a good teacher.   TAs running tutorials or teaching courses receive student evaluations, just like professors do. 

If you are working in the Math Help Centre you can ask the Math Help Centre Coordinator for feedback and if you are TAing for a course you should ask the professor you are working for to sit in on one of your tutorials to provide feedback.  The TA Coordinator can also provide feedback on your performance. 

If you feel your English language skills (spoken or written) could be improved you should speak to the TA Coordinator or the Associate Chair (Graduate) about opportunities for ESL (English as a Second Language) training.  Excellent English language skills are an asset not only for your TA work, but also for your thesis and your future career.

The MacPherson Institute also has many courses to help you improve your teaching skills https://mi.mcmaster.ca/teaching-development/ and you should be sure to take advantage of them.

A teaching letter is an essential part of an application for academic jobs (post-doctoral fellowships, tenure track positions) so you should ensure that that there is at least one faculty member who can write knowledgeably about your teaching.

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McMaster University - Faculty of Science

Mailing Address

Department of Mathematics & Statistics
McMaster University

Hamilton Hall, Room 218
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
L8S 4K1

Contact Information

Office Hours:
8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Telephone Inquiries:
+1 (905) 525-9140 ext.27034
Undergrad Email Inquiries:
undergrad@math.mcmaster.ca

McMaster University - Faculty of Science

Mailing Address

Department of Mathematics & Statistics
McMaster University

Hamilton Hall, Room 218
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
L8S 4K1

Contact Information

Office Hours:
8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Telephone Inquiries:
+1 (905) 525-9140 ext.27034
Undergrad Email Inquiries:
undergrad@math.mcmaster.ca